Townshend Brewery ‘Old House ESB’

Townshend's Old House ESB at The Third Eye

Townshend’s Old House ESB at The Third Eye

The big news in New Zealand’s good beer circles yesterday was the announcement that Townshend Brewery has signed a deal with Tuatara Brewing. The deal will allow 2014’s New Zealand Champion brewery to tap into Tuatara’s greater distribution network, and while Martin Townshend will still brew smaller batches in his shed down in Upper Moutere, larger batches of Townshend’s most popular beers will be brewed at Tuatara’s large brewery in Paraparaumu.

This is very good news indeed. I’ve been a huge fan of Martin Townshend’s superb beers for years now, admiring both his ability to make perfect examples of traditional styles while also playing confidently with more left-field brews. But I’ve also been in the privileged position of living in Wellington, where most of Townshend’s product is sold and where it’s never far away from the shelves or taps of one of our excellent craft beer stockists or bars.

With this news comes the hope that Townshend’s beers will see greater distribution around New Zealand and, perhaps, overseas. The more people can get a taste of why Martin Townshend is held in such esteem as a brewer, and why his brewery and his beer have won so many awards, the better!

To celebrate this union of two of my favourite breweries, there really was only one thing for it. So I walked into town, towards the south end of the CBD, to Karo Drive[i] where Tuatara have recently opened up ‘The Third Eye’. The Third Eye is an attractive little bar, housed in a historically significant building with the interior dressed with the original gorgeous native wood.

At one end of the high-vaulted rectangular rooms sits a microbrewery where Tuatara and the occasional guest brewer try out experimental brews, at the other is a range of leaners and couches for a small number of customers and a bar equipped with 14 taps. On those taps are poured at least 10 beers from Tuatara, both their popular ales and a few more unusual brews, while the other taps are set aside for a few guest brews and at least one cider.

It’s a good space, with a relaxed friendly feeling and relaxed friendly knowledgeable staff, in a part of Wellington that’s slowly but surely seeing an expansion in good beer and food – Crafters & Co and The Bresolin are quite nearby, and Garage Project’s cellar door and brewery is just a short walk away in Aro Street. And yesterday The Third Eye were pouring a pair of Townshend ales, so it was the perfect place to raise a glass to the news of the Tuatara Brewing and Townshend Brewery deal.

On tap was Townshend’s ‘Sutton Hoo’, an American amber ale. The Sutton Hoo is a superb example of the style with the hops and red malt well balanced – some brewers over-hop their American ambers and, to attempt balance then punch up the malt to the point where what emerges really is more of an American pale ale. But the Sutton Hoo is lighter, smoother, and with a gently delicious hoppy zing.

But what I was really at The Third Eye for was the ‘Old House ESB’. Extra Special Bitters are one of my favourite styles of beer, with the play between soft sweet malt and a cleansing bitterness always appealing. And of that style, Townshend’s Old House is one of the best I’ve tried.

Sitting in the warm wooded interior of The Third Eye, I smiled at the day’s news as I lifted the glass to my nose and breathed in the wonderful aroma of this ale. There’s hints of slightly acidic, slightly sour almonds and walnut in the scent, with smooth sweet tinges of honey. In the mouth the sweetness initially prevails, smooth creamy clover honey flavours floating amongst the delicious malty mouthfeel.

Then the slight nutty sourness returns in the after-taste, with a lingering sharp sweetness, reminiscent of salted caramel with perhaps just a touch of lemon rind. That play between sweet, sour and bitter is difficult to get right and get delicious, but the Old House does it well.

An ale well worth seeking out. And, with Townshend’s now having access to Tuatara’s distribution network, maybe you’ll see more of this and other beers from Townshend in your neck of the woods soon!


[i] Karo Drive, the newish inner-city route of State Highway 1, was apparently named by local school children as a contraction of “Kids of Aro”. However, one meaning of the word in Maori is “to parry, dodge, duck or avoid.” Given that Karo Drive has become infamous for red-light runners and endangered pedestrians, the name seems entirely appropriate!

Advertisements

Hopstock 2014 part 1

And it has begun, Hopstock 2014. 17 fresh hopped beers across 16 bars around Wellington city and nearby suburbs, over the space of four days.

I kicked it off with a glass of the Cassels & Sons ‘Fresh Hop’ pale ale with a delicious Caesar salad for lunch at Bin 44, and right from the start it was revealed that fresh hopping does not mean full-on hop-bomb insanity. This light little pale ale was gentle and sweet, very easily drinkable, a nice light beer. The hops adding a gentle bit of lift and freshness without doing damage to the taste buds.

Fork & Brewer 'Hopstepper'

Fork & Brewer ‘Hopstepper’

Then, after the working day was done, the ‘Wet Dream’ at The Bruhaus. A collaboration between Behemoth Brewing and The Twisted Hop, Wet Dream is more your traditional monster imperial India pale ale. Big, sticky and bursting with sharp gooseberry flavours from the Nelson Sauvin hops.  In contrast, the ‘Hopstepper’ American pale ale, brewed on site at Fork & Brewer was very malt-forward, hitting with a big burst of sweetness from the thick complex body before a the pine and grassy bitterness came through, with a nice touch of an almost minty aftertaste from the US Cascade hops.  My favourite so far, I think.

Up the road at Little Beer Quarter are a pair of collaborative beers between Townshend’s  and Liberty, two of my favourite brewers who seem at times poles apart. Martin Townshend tends to brew perfectly made variations of styles that have the malt as the centrepiece, while Jo Wood from Liberty is usually all about the hops. But, together, they just nailed it. Adding fresh Riwaka hops to the ‘Oldham’s Pil’s gave the pilsner a bright, summery zest with almost a suggestion of cider, while fresh Green Bullet and Nelson Sauvin hops in the delicious ‘Last of the Summer Ale’ extra special bitter turned that ESB into something with an aroma and finish that was deliciously Sauvignon Blanc-like.

Finally, just across the road at The Taphaus was the hoppiest of the day. Renaissance’s ‘Fresh Hop Grandmaster’ imperial India pale ale was positively glowing with hops, a massive aroma of lemon and lime lifting off the very pale and gorgeously clear beer. Coming in at 8%, this was a deliciously citrusy boozy thing, a delight to sit on and sip gently, marvelling how different flavours (including mandarin and mint) started to appear as the little glass warmed.

Despite owning the beer Bucket Fountain t-shirt, I missed last year’s Hopstock due to illness. And this year, the presence of so many beers across such a large area of the city had me thinking that collecting the entire set would be an unachievable and likely dangerous task. I’ve changed my mind about that, now.

Renaissance Fresh Hop Grandmaster

Renaissance Fresh Hop Grandmaster

Sticking to half-pints or tasters, drinking slowly, eating food, and enjoying the walk as much as the beer has made the idea of visiting all of the bars over the next few days very attractive, and very achievable. And, as the five beers I tried yesterday revealed, it’s not all about death by humulus lupulus. There’s different styles of beers, and only two of the five I tried would be described as ‘extremely hoppy.’ The rest used the fresh hopping to emphasise or alter certain tastes within the style.

And it’s looking to be a good way to get a feel of bars I haven’t been to, or been back to for a while.  I hadn’t set foot in The Bruhaus for over three years after a disappointing first experience, but I was very pleased with the feel and service of the place now.  It seems a nice little bar, in a part of the city that needs more good little bars.

So, tonight, I might round off most of the other inner city bars on the trail, then over ANZAC day and Saturday I’ll pick off the outliers. And if you’re in Wellington up to the 26th of April, I recommend you head on off to the Hopstock website and pick up the trail yourself.

It really is an education in fresh-hopped beer. Now, when’s the malt and yeast festival..?